2013-07-26

Here we go again: Tipton, Lamborn offer same oil & gas giveaways

The House Natural Resources Committee met Wednesday to debate a number of bills related to wilderness protection and energy issues. Among these bills were Congressman Doug Lamborn’s H.R. 1965 and Representative Scott Tipton’s H.R. 1394.

Reps. Doug Lamborn and Scott Tipton, working hard for Big Oil

Reps. Doug Lamborn and Scott Tipton, working hard for Big Oil

Rep. Lamborn’s bill mandates leasing quotas for oil and gas companies, encourages speculation, and bars the public, local officials and others from protesting potentially dangerous leasing decisions. It also endangers western water supplies and local economies by encouraging reckless oil shale speculation on public lands. Rep. Tipton’s bill essentially establishes energy development as the primary use of public lands. This would jeopardize the billion-dollar outdoor recreation and tourism industries, as well as the hundreds of thousands of Western jobs they create.

These bills have already faced outcry from Westerners who use these endangered public lands. Sportsmen for Responsible Energy Development noted that it is senseless to make more land available when the oil and gas industry already has more than 7,000 unused drilling permits.

New spills highlight need for better regulation

It was reported this week that more than 2,000 gallons of benzene contaminated water spilled from a well south of New Castle earlier this month. In another incident, a malfunctioning well sprayed gas and oil nearly 1,000 feet onto a neighboring farmer’s field. These incidents highlight the risks involved in fossil fuel development and demonstrate the need for this development to be properly regulated.

In the last legislative session, Governor Hickenlooper stalled bills that would have increased the number of well inspectors in the state and increased fines for companies who were negligent. This week’s news should raise further questions about who Governor Hickenlooper is working for, Coloradans, or oil and gas companies.

Wilderness report on places too wild to drill

A new report from The Wilderness Society highlights a dozen landmarks that are threatened by the encroachment of oil and gas drilling. These sites include Arches National Park in Utah and Chaco Canyon in New Mexico. The report calls on the Department of the Interior and Members of Congress to protect these American treasures. Jim Gale, founding member of Park Rangers for Our Lands, was quoted in the report saying:

“Our National Parks protect America’s treasures, our natural and cultural  heritage, and we need to insure their protection from the harm that comes from oil and gas drilling. Arches National Park should not be surrounded by drill rigs. It seems obvious but apparently we need to keep reminding the oil and gas industry and the federal government, so Park Rangers for Our Lands will do just that.”

Arches National Park

 

Gas industry blows smoke on proposed BLM fracking rules

The Western Energy Alliance (WEA) and the Independent Petroleum Association of America (IPAA) released a faulty analysis of the proposed Department of the Interior fracking rule. It overestimates the annual cost of the rule by over $310 million

John Dunham & Associates, the firm that completed the study, claims that the proposed rule would cost companies $345 million annually. But, the firm arrived at this figure by misrepresenting the report in a way that inflates costs nearly ten-fold. The report makes assumptions about a rule that wouldn’t actually apply to gas drilling and uses that misapplication to grossly inflate the costs of the proposed rule.

Wyoming resident express concerns over water quality

The state of Wyoming is in the process of requiring baseline testing of groundwater for areas where drilling of oil and gas would take place. As the state decides how the testing will proceed, landowners want to ensure that there are the proper accountability measures included in these rules so that oil and gas companies who do contaminate ground water are punished for violations.